Japanese salads weight in gold

Orti-Giappone-un-kg-di-lattuga-quasi-10-Euro

Japanese salads weight in gold

The Italian daily newspaper “Repubblica” states something which seems unreal: in Japan salads cost as much as an Italian fiorentina steak! If you haven’t seen the news lately, salads are very expensive in Japan because they are difficult to grow.

Infact, vegetables are surprising expensive in Japan because terrains in this country were contaminated by the latest environmental disasters (Fukushima nuclear explosion and the Tsunami).

For such reason, Japanese have found a very smart solution: to grow vegetables in vertical farms. The first one vertical farm was settled at Yokosuka district. But this method of growing plants is not easy at all. Infact, nowadays fruits and vegetables in this country are considered luxury items. Certainly, this growing method is a unique blend of agriculture, allowing to produce more food than ever before. But, weight in gold.

Vegetable gardens on the roof

It seems that, in the next years, vegetables gardens on the roof seem the best solution. In fact, to set out a series of vegetable gardens would provide some benefits. It is possible to grow fruits and vegetables on the top of people’s house. This solution was already agreed also by Japanese.

Rooftop vegetables solution

It is easy to create a low cost edible rooftop garden if you don’t know where to grow vegetables. Although green roofs have been around for centuries, the concept was popularized only recently. Now a new type of roof garden has emerged even in urban areas! You can grow most vegetables, herbs and even some fruits on top of your house with a very low cost.

These vertical vegetable gardens are going to provide many benefits for people worldwide. Many urban dwellers have flowerpots or container gardens on their roofs! Thanks to this choice people are helping to insulate their house, while providing fresh food for their families.

Definitely, vertical gardens are a positive and good ethical choice.

 

Italian Link: http://www.natureatblog.com/orti-giappone/